History of Aikido

Aikido developed from Japanese Bujutsu (“warrior skills”) which emerged over a thousand years ago.

Master Morihei Ueshiba (1883-1969), founder of Aikido, studied various bujutsu, including Kito-ryu, Yagyu-ryu and Daito-ryu jujutsu, mastering the secrets of each.

He also trained himself under Onisaburo Deguchi, an outstanding religious leader of his time. Known to his followers with reverent affection as O Sensei, Ueshiba began teaching in a dojo near Kyoto and named his art Aiki Budo.

He later moved to Tokyo, establishing what became the Headquarters Dojo. In 1942, the name of the art was changed to Aikido. After World War II, O Sensei's Aikido spread rapidly through the international martial art community, establishing itself in the United States in the early 1960s.

When O Sensei died in 1969, his son Kisshomaru became Doshu (Master) succeeding his father in the traditional Japanese manner. Upon the death of Ueshiba Kisshomaru Sensei in early 1999, his son Moriteru has assumed the title Doshu, becoming the third member of the family to lead the Aikido community.

Flynn Sensei's teacher, Chiba Shihan, is a direct student of the founder, and has been instrumental in the growth of Aikido within Great Britain, the European Continent, and America.